Sharjah, UAE,
03
February
2022
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18:57 PM
Europe/Amsterdam

The Africa Institute in Sharjah, UAE, Appoints New Faculty and Fellows

The Africa Institute in Sharjah, UAE—a center for research, documentation, and study of Africa and its diaspora—has announced seven new faculty appointments, fellows of its Research Fellowship Program, the fellows of its inaugural class of Global Africa Translation Fellows, and the launch of a new Creative Writing fellowship program.

The new faculty members specialize in African history, political science, art theory and more, starting their positions in 2021 and in 2022:

  • Emery Kalema, Assistant Professor of African History - Emery Kalema is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow in Studies in Historical Trauma and Transformation at Stellenbosch University, South Africa, and a Summer Program in Social Science Fellow (2018-2019) at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton University, New Jersey, USA.
  • Françoise Vergès, Professor of Political Science - Françoise Vergès is a political scientist by training and a well-known scholar and public intellectual.
  • Amy Niang, Associate Professor of Political Science - Amy Niang’s research interests are broadly centered around the history of state formation and sovereignty, Africa’s International relations, and the history of geopolitics. 
  • Binyam Sisay Mendisu, Associate Professor of African Languages and Linguistics - Binyam Sisay Mendisu completed his PhD in Linguistics from the University of Oslo in 2008. Between 2008 and 2016, he taught full-time at Addis Ababa University (AAU) as an assistant and later associate professor.
  • Elizabeth W. Giorgis, Associate Professor of Art History, Theory and Criticism - Elizabeth W. Giorgis received her PhD in the History of Art and Visual Studies from Cornell University in 2010 and her Masters in Museum Studies from New York University in 2004.
  • Surafel Wondimu Abebe, Assistant Professor of Performance Studies and Theorym - Abebe studied Literature (BA) and Cultural Studies (MA) at Addis Ababa University (AAU) (2010).
  • Premesh Lalu, Professor of History - Professor Premesh Lalu was a founding director of the Centre for Humanities Research (CHR) at the University of the Western Cape. Under his leadership, the CHR was awarded the Department of Science and Innovation-National Research Foundation Flagship on Critical Thought in African Humanities.

The Africa Institute Research Fellowships Program provides the opportunity for both junior and senior scholars of African and African diaspora studies to focus on a research project and participate in ongoing scholarly and intellectual activities during their term at the Institute.

The Ali A. Mazrui Senior Fellows in Global African Studies is in honor of the esteemed late Professor Ali A. Mazrui, whose contributions to the field of African Studies have left a remarkable and transformative impact on the world. This fellowship is open to senior scholars whose work shows emphasis on African and African diaspora studies and their intersections with social sciences and the humanities. 

  • Naminata Diabate - Naminata Diabate is associate professor of comparative literature at Cornell University. She is a member of the core faculty in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (FGSS), and affiliated faculty in Romance Studies; Africana Studies and Research Center (ASRC); Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies; Performing and Media Arts; and Visual Studies.
  • Abdul Mohammed Hussein Sheriff - Abdul Sheriff was born and educated in Zanzibar, and completed his bachelors and master’s degrees at the University of California in Los Angeles in 1966. He went on to receive his PhD from the School of Oriental & African Studies (SOAS), University of London in 1971.
  • Ahmad Sikainga - Ahmad Sikainga is a professor of African History at the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA. His academic interests embrace the study of Africa, the African Diaspora, and the Middle East with a focus on slavery, labor, urban history, and popular culture. The geographical focus of Sikainga’s research is the Sudan, the Nile Valley, North Africa, and the Persian Gulf.

The Fatema Mernissi Postdoctoral Fellowship in Social and Cultural Studies is named in honor of the world-renowned Moroccan scholar, the late Professor Fatema Mernissi, whose contributions to gender, feminism, sociopolitical change and Islam, have been critical and transformational. The fellowship is open to emerging scholars in the field of social sciences with specific emphasis on gender, feminism and cultural studies and visual cultures, as long as they intersect with African and African diaspora studies.

  • Netsanet Gebremichael - Netsanet Gebremichael holds a PhD in interdisciplinary Social Studies   from Makerere Institute of Social Research, Makerere University Uganda in 2019.   She is currently an Assistant Professor at the Institute of Ethiopian Studies, Addis Ababa University.

The   Inaugural   Okwui   Enwezor   Postdoctoral   Fellowship   in   Visual Culture, Performance Studies and Critical Humanities is named in honor of the late Okwui Enwezor, the famed scholar, curator and art critic, whose contributions to the disciplines of art history, art criticism and cultural studies have left a groundbreaking and dynamic impact. This fellowship is open to emerging scholars whose work focuses on visual and performance studies and intersections with discourses of art history, performance studies and critical humanities. Eligible applicants must have earned their doctoral degree (PhD) within the last five years, prior to assuming the fellowship.

The Global Africa Translation Fellowship Program offers grants toward the translation of historic and contemporary African poetry, novels, and more into English and Arabic, welcoming applicants from across the Global South to submit a request for a grant of up to $5,000 to complete translations of works from the African continent and its diaspora. Selected works may be retranslations of classic texts or previously untranslated contemporary works, collections of poetry, novels, prose, or critical theory.

The 2021 grantees are:

  • Reem Abou-El-Fadl, for translation and editing of the Arabic-language memoir of Egyptian intellectual and activist Helmi Sharawy, Sira Misriyya Ifriqiya (An Egyptian African Story), which was first published in 2019 by independent Cairo press Dar Al-Ain;
  • Adil Babikir, for the translation of Sudanese author Abdelaziz Baraka Sakin’s book Samahani from Arabic into English;
  • Claretta Holsey, for the translation of four scholarly essays from René Ménil’s Tracées: Identité, Négritude, Esthétique aux Antilles from French into English;
  • David Shook, for the translation of Francisco José Tenreiro’s collected poems from Portuguese into English, including his seminal 1942 debut Ilha de Nome Santo (Island with a Holy Name).

The 2022 grantees are:

  • Hussein El Hajj, for the translation of author Salma Khalil’s unpublished book Where Will We Go in Winter? — an anthology of young Arabs’ personal reflections on their experiences of diaspora and exile since the ‘Arab Spring’ uprisings of 2011 — from English into Arabic. ­
  • Margaux Fitoussi, to translate Waiting for Omar Gatlato, written in French by Wassyla Tamzali and published in 1979, into English. Waiting for Omar Gatlato is an early sourcebook on Algerian and Tunisian experimental cinema from the end of the 1960s through the late 1970s. The monograph is split into two parts — “A Look at Algerian Cinema” and “A Fragmentary Introduction to Tunisian Cinema” — and includes film analysis, stills, shooting notes, production documentation, and interviews with individual filmmakers.
  • Myriam Amri & Margaux Fitoussi, to complete the translation of Tunisian Yankee (2016), written by Cecile Oumahni and published by Elyzad Éditions (Tunis, Tunisia) —from French into English—of the historical novel.
  • Nathalie Handal, for translation and editing of Récitatif au pays des ombres, Recitatif in the Country of Shadows from French (with some Creole) into English.
  • Salma Khalil, for the translation of Coptic-Egyptian author Shady Lewis’s third novel A Brief History of Genesis and East Cairo, published by Dar al-Ein in 2021, from Arabic into English.

The creative writing fellowship, the Tejumola Olaniyan Creative Writers-in-Residence Fellowship Program, honors the late Nigerian Professor Tejumola Olaniyan and his remarkable intellectual legacy in the field of African literature and critical theory. The residency program welcomes applications from novelists, short story writers, playwrights, poets and script writers related to Africa and the African diaspora for a grant of up to $12,000. Applications are now open with a deadline of February 28.

As a research-based think-tank and institute for postgraduate studies, the Africa Institute also offers both masters and PhD programs dedicated to training a new generation of critical thinkers in African and African diaspora studies and evolving a new model for academic research, teaching and documentation in the field.

For more information on the programs and how to apply, please visit africainstitute.org or see below for more on the staff and fellowships below.

About The Africa Institute

Established in 2018, The Africa Institute in Sharjah, UAE, is an interdisciplinary academic research institute dedicated to the study, research, and documentation of Africa and the African diaspora. As the only institution of its kind located in the Gulf—the historical nexus of African-Arab cultural exchange—The Africa Institute is uniquely positioned to expand understanding of African and African diaspora studies as a global enterprise. The Africa Institute’s curriculum of postgraduate studies is designed to train the next generation of critical thinkers in African and African diaspora studies, and through its program of international symposia and conferences, visual art exhibitions and artist commissions, film and performance series, and community classes and outreach events, the Institute is expanding public understanding of Arab and African exchange within not only the scholarly community but also the local Sharjah community, the region, and around the globe.

New Faculty - Bios

Emery Kalema, Assistant Professor of African History

 

IMG_4080 4Emery Kalema is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow in Studies in Historical Trauma and Transformation at Stellenbosch University, South Africa, and a Summer Program in Social Science Fellow (2018-2019) at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton University, New Jersey, USA. He holds a PhD in History from the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa (2017).

His research interests include power and politics, body and embodiment, violence, memory, trauma and suffering, as well as the postcolony. He is currently working on a book project, based on his doctoral dissertation, tentatively entitled, “Violence and Memory: The Mulele 'Rebellion' in Postcolonial Congo". The book is an exploration of suffering caused by the Mulele rebellion (1963-1968), the reproduction of suffering across time and its inscription in the imaginary of the survivors. It is also about power, its meaning and its intersection with memory and suffering. Kalema will be conducting a set of philosophical reflections around the theme Memory as Freedom and Right upon completion of his current book project.

Kalema’s publications include “’The Mulele ‘Rebellion’, Congolese Political Regimes, and the Politics of Forgetting” in Cahiers d’Etudes Africaine (2018), “Scars, Marked Bodies, and Suffering: The Mulele ‘Rebellion’ in Postcolonial Congo” in Journal of African History (2018), Religion et médecine au Congo: pratiques et savoirs des assistants médicaux "indigènes" issus de Kisantu (Fomulac) et de leurs patients (1937-1960)” in Vincent Viaene, Bram Cleys & Jan De Maeyer (eds) and Religion, Colonization and Decolonization in Congo, 1885-1960, by Leuven University Press (2018).

Françoise Vergès, Professor of Political Science

Francoise P1010298Françoise Vergès is a political scientist by training and a well-known scholar and public intellectual. She has worked as a journalist in France. She lived in Algeria and Mexico before eventually settling in the USA where she obtained her BA from San Diego State University, California, USA (1989). She received her MA, Ph.D. in Political Theory from University of California, Berkeley in 1990 and 1995 respectively. She has taught at Sussex University and Goldsmiths College, London, and has been an invited professor at University of California, Berkeley and Brown University.

Vergès has done extensive research on postcolonial theory, creolization, psychoanalysis, slavery and the economy of predation. Her publications include The Wombs of Women: Race, Capital, Feminism published by Duke University Press (2020) and A Decolonial Feminism by Pluto Press (2021).

 

Amy Niang, Associate Professor of Political Science

AmyNiangAmy Niang’s research interests are broadly centered around the history of state formation and sovereignty, Africa’s International relations, and the history of geopolitics.  Her work has been published in journals such as International Relations; Alternatives; Politics; African Studies; African Economic History, Journal of Ritual Studies and in many edited collections. She is the author of The Postcolonial African State in Transition: Stateness and Modes of Sovereignty (2018); co-editor (with Baz Lecocq) of Identités sahéliennes en temps de crise: histoires, enjeux et perspectives (2019) and Researching Peacebuilding in Africa: Reflections on Theory, Fieldwork and Context (with Ismail Rashid, 2020). Prior to her current position, she taught at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, the Mohammed VI Polytechnic University in Rabat, and has also held visiting positions and fellowships at the University of Sao Paulo, Princeton University, the University of Halle-Wittenberg, the University of Michigan, the Institute of Peace and Security Studies (IPSS) amongst many other institutions. Niang holds a BA in International Relations (2005) and a MA in Political Economy from the University of Tsukuba (2007) and a PhD in Politics and International Relations from the University of Edinburgh (2011). 

Binyam Sisay Mendisu, Associate Professor of African Languages and Linguistics

Binyam-AhmBinyam Sisay Mendisu completed his PhD in Linguistics from the University of Oslo in 2008. Between 2008 and 2016, he taught full-time at Addis Ababa University (AAU) as an Assistant and later associate professor. As a founding Dean of Humanities (2010-2012) at AAU, Mendisu initiated and ran series of multidisciplinary and critical discussions dubbed ‘Conversations on Humanities’. 

As an education specialist at UNESCO-IICBA, his work focused on providing technical backstopping for teacher policy development in Uganda, the Seychelles, Burundi, Malawi and Mozambique, and leading projects and initiatives on mother tongue and early childhood education. 

He has initiated and served as a project leader of an international project ‘Linguistic Capacity Building: Tools for Inclusive Development of Ethiopia’ (2014-2016), which was supported by the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD). Mendisu is a member of the Global Young Academy (GYA) since 2017 and he is an inaugural fellow of the African Science Leadership Program (ASLP) at the University of Pretoria, South Africa. Currently, he sits on the Steering Committee of ASLP and serves as one of the facilitators of the program. Moreover, he is a member of the 2021 Letten Prize Committee that recognizes the contribution of one early career researcher globally who is able to exemplify how global human development challenges can be solved through research.

Mendisu’s research considers language as an archive of local knowledge and memory.

His publications include Multilingual Ethiopia: Linguistic Challenges and Capacity Building Efforts published by University of Oslo (2016), “Ethiopian Linguistics at the Dawn of the 21st Century” in Journal of Ethiopian Studies (2009), Restoring African studies to its linguistic identity: reflections on Ethiopian studies published in Social Dynamics, “What is in a Term? A Historical and Linguistic Examination of the Revolutionary Terminology – yiwdem ‘let it be demolished’ in Amharic 1974-1977” in Journal of Northeast African Studies (2013) alongside Abdu Ahmed Ali and Aquilina Mawadza, and Amharic-English/English-Amharic Dictionary and Phrasebook published by Hippocrene Books (2018).
 

Elizabeth W. Giorgis, Associate Professor of Art History, Theory and Criticism

Elisabeth-Woldegiorgis-AhmElizabeth W. Giorgis received her PhD in the History of Art and Visual Studies from Cornell University in 2010 and her Masters in Museum Studies from New York University in 2004. She is a member of the editorial board for Transition Magazine, North East African Studies (NEAS) and for Ethiopian Journal of Social Sciences (EJSS). She is an advisory editorial board member for Journal for Critical African Studies, Callaloo Art and contributing editor for Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East (CSSAAME).

She is a recipient of several fellowships including The Ali Mazrui Senior Fellowship for Global African Studies at The Africa Institute, Distinguished Visiting Scholar at Brown University, a visiting professor at the Academy of Fine Art in Vienna and a fellow at the Rockefeller Bellagio Center Academic Writing Resident Fellows Program. Modernist Art in Ethiopia (2019, Ohio University Press) was shortlisted for the African Studies Association UK Fage and Oliver Prize for outstanding and original scholarship on Africa. It was also a finalist for the African Studies Association Best Book Prize (formerly known as the Melville J. Herskovits prize). It won the African Studies Association’s 2020 Bethwell A. Ogbot Book Prize as the best book on East African Studies. 

She has curated several exhibitions at the Modern Art Museum: Gebre Kristos Desta Center, more recently, the works of Danish Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson. She has also participated in several international conferences and public lectures. In January 2019, she served as convener for the first African Humanities Initiative called Africa as Concept: Decolonization, Emancipation and Freedom that was sponsored by the Mellon Foundation and the Consortium of the Humanities, Centers and Institutes (CHCI).

Giorgis’s current research is focused on Ethiopian women’s aesthetic in the wider politics of exclusion. Her book, Modernist Art in Ethiopia––published by Ohio University Press––was released in February 2019. It is the first comprehensive monographic study of Ethiopian visual modernism within a broader social and intellectual history.

Her publications include Unheard Voices: Contestations Over Representation published by London’s School of Oriental and African Studies (2020), "Skunder Boghossian: A Brief Introduction to the Man and the Artist." Callaloo 40 (2017), World of Malls: Architecture of Consumption, Hatje Cantz Verlag (2016), Art Academy of Vienna, Time Sensitive Activity: The Works of Olafur Eliasson, published by Addis Ababa’s Central Publishers (2016), and Modernist Art in Ethiopia printed by Ohio University Press (2019).

Surafel Wondimu Abebe, Assistant Professor of Performance Studies and Theorym

Surafel_WondimuAbebe studied Literature (BA) and Cultural Studies (MA) at Addis Ababa University (AAU) (2010). He served at AAU as a lecturer, researcher, and Deputy Dean of Humanities. He continued working with AAU as an assistant professor at the Institute of Ethiopian Studies, Center for African Studies, and College of Performing and Visual Arts after he completed his PhD in Performance Historiography at the University of Minnesota (2018). He is also a board member of a multi-genre online journal, AGITATE, at the University of Minnesota.

Abebe uses academia, performance, and media as sites of cultural politics from which to interrogate representational practices. Abebe engages with sedimented embodied historiographies in order to understand what it means to be human in the here and now. Currently, he is working on his book project, which studies the ways in which Ethiopian female performers maneuver and reinvent spaces of empires, revolutions, and neoliberal globalization.  He is currently working on forthcoming publications.

Premesh Lalu, Professor of History

Premesh 3Before joining the Africa Institute in Sharjah, Professor Premesh Lalu was a founding director of the Centre for Humanities Research (CHR) at the University of the Western Cape. Under his leadership, the CHR was awarded the Department of Science and Innovation-National Research Foundation Flagship on Critical Thought in African Humanities. During his term as director, he worked with colleagues to establish the CHR’s Greatmore Arts and Humanities Hub that will host a Laboratory of Kinetic Objects (with Handspring Puppet Company and Ukwanda Puppetry and Design Collective), a programme in music and new media, a documentary film training programme, and an international consortium on Communicating the Humanities.

Lalu has published widely in academic journals on historical discourse and the study of the humanities and is a regular contributor of public opinion pieces on the arts and humanities. His articles have appeared in History and Theory, Journal of Southern African Studies, Journal of Asian, African and Middle Eastern Studies, Critical Times, Kronos: Southern African Histories, Economic and Political Weekly, and the South African Historical Journal. His first book, The Deaths of Hintsa: Post-apartheid South Africa and the Shape of Recurring Pasts (2009) was included in the Alan Paton longlist in 2010. He is also co-editor of Remains of the Social: Desiring the Post-apartheid (Wits University Press, 2017), co-editor of Becoming UWC: Reflections, Pathways, and Unmaking Apartheid's Legacies, and a forthcoming edited volume with Patricia Hayes and G. Arunima, Love and Revolution in the Twentieth-Century Colonial and Postcolonial World (Palgrave, forthcoming). A current book, Unlearning Apartheid, is being revised for publication with Polity Press in the UK.

Lalu is a board member of the international Consortium of Humanities Centres and Institutes, the Advisory Board Member of Kate Hamburger Kollegs in Munich, a juror at the Akademie Schloss Solitude in Stuttgart, and past chairperson of the Handspring Trust for Puppetry in Education.

Ali A. Mazrui Senior Fellows in Global African Studies - Bios

Naminata Diabate

WebProfileNaminata Diabate is associate professor of comparative literature at Cornell University. She is a member of the core faculty in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (FGSS), and affiliated faculty in Romance Studies; Africana Studies and Research Center (ASRC); Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies; Performing and Media Arts; and Visual Studies. Diabate holds a PhD in Comparative Literature with dual concentrations in African Diaspora Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies from the University at Texas at Austin (2011).

A scholar of African and African diaspora studies and sexuality and gender studies with linguistic expertise in Malinké, French, English, Nouchi, Spanish, and Latin, her work seeks to redefine how we understand specific forms of embodied agency in the neoliberal present in global Africa. Diabate engages multiple sites, including novels of 20th and 21st centuries, online and social media, pictorial arts, film, journalism, and oral traditions from Africa, black America, Afro-Hispanic America, and the French Antilles. Her most recent provocations of defiant disrobing, erotic pleasure, and the impact of Internet media on queerness have appeared in her book, Naked Agency: Genital Cursing and Biopolitics in Africa (Duke University Press, 2020), peer-reviewed journals, and collections of essays, such as Nka: Journal of Contemporary African Art, Research in African Literatures, African Literature Today (ALT), Interventions, Routledge Handbook of African Literature, and Fieldwork in the Humanities.

In addition to her interventions in the conventional academic channels, Diabate contributes regularly to several media outlets, including newspapers, women’s magazines, and podcasts. Recently, she wrote for the women’s magazine Voix/Voie de Femme in Côte d’Ivoire, PBS’s Academic Minute, The New Books in Women’s History podcast, and the South African Podcast series, Sound Africa. Diabate’s forthcoming work will appear in African Studies Review, The Journal African Literature Association (JALA) and the edited volume, New Visions in African and African Diaspora Studies. Currently, she is working on two monographs, “The Problem of Pleasure in Global Africa” and “Digital Insurgencies and Bodily Domains.”

Abdul Mohammed Hussein Sheriff

WebProfileAbdul Sheriff was born and educated in Zanzibar, and completed his bachelors and master’s degrees at the University of California in Los Angeles in 1966. He went on to receive his PhD from the School of Oriental & African Studies (SOAS), University of London in 1971.

Abdul Sheriff taught history at the University of Dar es Salaam from 1969-1991, served as Advisor & Principal Curator of the Zanzibar Museums from 1993-2005, and as Executive Director of the Zanzibar Indian Ocean Research Institute from 2007 until 2012. He also served as Chairman and Member of the Presidential Committees on the State University of Zanzibar from 1995 until 2002, and Chairman of the Zanzibar Constitutional Forum from 2012 until 2014 and Delegate to the Tanzanian Constituent Assembly  in 2014.

Abdul Sheriff has published several books, including Slaves, Spices & Ivory in Zanzibar (1987), and The Dhow Cultures of the Indian Ocean – Cosmopolitanism, Culture & Islam (2010); edited History & Conservation of Zanzibar Stone Town (1995); and co-edited Zanzibar Under Colonial Rule (1991), The Indian Ocean: Oceanic Connections & the Creation of New Societies (2014), and Transition from Slavery in Zanzibar & Mauritius, (2017), as well numerous scholarly articles. His current research interests are on Zanzibar, the Swahili culture, and the Indian Ocean.

Ahmad Sikainga

Ahmad Sikainga is a professor of African History at the Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA. His academic interests embrace the study of Africa, the African Diaspora, and the Middle East with a focus on slavery, labor, urban history, and popular culture. The geographical focus of Sikainga’s research is the Sudan, the Nile Valley, North Africa, and the Persian Gulf.

His publications include Sudan Defense Force: Origin and Role, 1925-1955 (1983), Western Bahr al-Ghazal under British Rule, 1898-1956 (1991), Slaves into Workers: Emancipation and Labor in Colonial Sudan (1996), City of Steel and Fire: A Social History of Atbara, Sudan's Railway Town, 1906-1984 (2002). He co-edited Africa and World War II (Cambridge, 2015), Post-conflict Reconstruction in Africa (2006), and Civil War in the Sudan, 1983-1989 (1993). In addition, Sikainga has published dozens of articles and book chapters. His research was supported by fellowships and grants from such institutions as the Andrew Mellon Fellowship at Harvard University, National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the American Philosophical Society, the J. William Fulbright program, and the Social Science Research Council, just to name a few. Sikainga is currently working on two book projects: Free and Unfree Labor in a Changing Economy: Slavery, Oil, and Wage Labor in Qatar examines the link between slavery, the oil industry, and wage labor in Qatar from the late nineteenth to mid-twentieth centuries, and Slavery, Ethnicity. The second projected, titled  Identity, and the Development of Popular Culture in Contemporary Sudan explores the role of former slaves, their descendants, immigrants, and other subaltern groups in the development of distinct styles of music, dance, and fashion that have shaped Sudanese urban popular culture.

Fatema Mernissi Postdoctoral Fellow in Social and Cultural Studies - Bio

Netsanet Gebremichael

PHDE6404Netsanet Gebremichael holds a PhD in interdisciplinary Social Studies   from Makerere Institute of Social Research, Makerere University Uganda in 2019.   She is currently an Assistant Professor at the Institute of Ethiopian Studies, Addis Ababa University.

Netsanet’s recent published academic articles include Travel Writing as an Empirical Mode of Knowing: A Methodological Critique of James Bruce’s Travels and Adventures in Abyssinia, in MISR Review, Ambivalent memories of imperial legacies: Asmara as ‘beautiful' and ‘segregationist' from Ethiopia Journal of Cultural Studies, and

PPPs in Ethiopia: The New Frontier. In Development Alternatives with Women for a New Era.

She has recently concluded a three-year research project entitled: “Womanhood” as a category of struggle and lives:  Chronicling Ethiopian Women’s experience and “The Women Question” in Ethiopian Student Movement 1950-78, which was funded by SOAS, University of London, as part of the Parliament for People Research Grant. The research output included a multimedia art exhibition co-curated by Netsanet, titled in Amharic ቅብብሎሽ that featured archival materials, oral life histories, photographs, video, and print textile installations along with documentary film screening. The exhibition illuminated the voices and lives of women who actively participated in the Ethiopian Students Movement (1950-1978) at The Gebrekirstos Desta Center for The Modern Art museum, Addis Ababa University on display from May - June 2021.

2021 The Global Africa Translation Fellow Bios

Bio PhotoReem Abou-El-Fadl is Senior Lecturer in Comparative Politics of the Middle East at SOAS University of London. Her work explores the politics of nationalism, protest, and transnational solidarity in Middle East and Afro-Asian spaces. Her book, Foreign Policy as Nation Making: Turkey and Egypt in the Cold War was published by Cambridge University Press in 2019. She is the editor of Revolutionary Egypt: Connecting Domestic and International Struggles (Routledge, 2015), and co-editor of the Jadaliyya Egypt page. She translates from Arabic and Turkish frequently in her research.

 

 

Adil BabikirAdil Babikir is a Sudanese translator and copywriter based in the UAE. His published translations include Mansi: a Rare Man in his Own Way by Tayeb Salih (Banipal Books, 2020); Modern Sudanese Poetry: an Anthology (University of Nebraska Press, 2019); The Jungo: Stakes of the Earth, a novel by Abdelaziz Baraka Sakin (Africa World Press, USA, 2015); Literary Sudans: an Anthology of Literature from Sudan and South Sudan, (Red Sea Press, USA, 2016); Summer Maze, a collection of short stories by Leila Aboulela, translated to Arabic (Dar al-Musawarrat, Khartoum, 2017). Babikir is a contributing editor of Banipal Magazine. Some of his translations appeared in Banipal, The Guardian, Al-Doha magazine, and Jalada Africa. His forthcoming works include a collection of Sudanese short novels and a book on the legendary Bedouin poet al-Hardallo.

Author Photo, HorizontalClaretta Holsey has received a Jane Mead Fellowship for her poetry thesis and a Global Africa Translation Fellowship from the Africa Institute in Sharjah. Her poetry and creative non-fiction have appeared in New Delta Review, The Columbia Review, Eclectica Magazine, PromptPress, on poets.org, and elsewhere. A book of her ekphrastic poems—inspired by the artwork of Malcolm Corley and written in collaboration with fellow poets Jorrell Watkins, DJ Savarese, and Lateef McLeod—will be published by PromptPress in fall 2021. Also in the fall, she will pursue an MFA in Literary Translation at the University of Iowa. A recent graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, she is a Production Editor at Copper Canyon Press.

 

DavidShookFitzroviaDavid Shook is a poet and translator as well as the founding editor of Phoneme Media, now an imprint of Deep Vellum Publishing. They have translated over 15 books, including Mario Bellatin’s Beauty Salon, Jorge Eduardo Eielson’s Room in Rome, a finalist for both the National Translation Award and PEN Prize for Poetry in Translation, and Conceição Lima’s forthcoming selected poems, for which they received a National Endowment for the Arts Translation Fellowship. Shook has edited special features on literature from Burundi and Equatorial Guinea, for Words Without Borders and World Literature Today respectively, translated Obi’s Nightmare, the first ever graphic novel from Equatorial Guinea, and published the first-ever literary translation from the Lingala, Richard Ali A Mutu’s Mr. Fix-It. Current translation projects include the poetry and fiction of Cabo Verdean experimentalist President Jorge Carlos Fonseca. 

The Africa Institute’s ongoing research fellowships provide the opportunity for both junior and senior scholars of African and African diaspora studies to focus on a research project and participate in ongoing scholarly and intellectual activities during their term at the Institute. The three Research Fellowships Programs are: The Inaugural Okwui Enwezor Postdoctoral Fellowship in Visual Culture, Performance Studies and Critical Humanities; The Fatema Mernissi Postdoctoral Fellowship in Social and Cultural Studies; and The Ali A. Mazrui Senior Fellowship in Global African Studies.

 

2022 The Global Africa Translation Fellow Bios

 

Picture1Hussein El Hajj  is an Egyptian translator and editor who has produced numerous publications, including an Arabic poetry collection, Tuyuf / Spectres (Yadawia for handmade books, 2015), and the translations (from English into Arabic) of A User’s Guide to Demanding the Impossible by Gavin Grindon and John Jordan, (Yadawia for handmade books, 2018) and two online anthologies (2018) on alternative higher education in association with CILAS: On the Emergence of Pigeon Towers and a collection of collaborative student translations, Education as Translation.

 

Picture2Margaux Fitoussi is currently working on her Ph.D. at Columbia University, where she is studying “the shift in politics and political consciousness as reflected in visual culture in post-revolutionary Tunisia”. In addition to her Harvard Divinity School coursework, Fitoussi has studied Arabic, anthropology, and history with a North African focus — cross-registrations that allowed her to “play in the best way possible academically”.

 

 

 

 

Picture3Myriam Amri is a PhD candidate in the joint degree in Anthropology and Middle Eastern Studies. Her research is a historical anthropology of money in Algeria and Tunisia, focusing on notions of materiality, value and power. She is also interested in questions of space, knowledge production and gender studies. She received a dual-bachelor degree from SciencesPo Paris and Columbia University, an MSc from the London School of Economics and is the co-founder of “Asameena”, an Arab literary collective.

 

 

 

Picture4Nathalie Handal is a poet, playwright, nonfiction, and literary travel writer. Handal is the editor of the groundbreaking classic The Poetry of Arab Women: A Contemporary Anthology, winner of the PEN Oakland Josephine Miles Book Award, and named one of the top 10 Feminist Books by The Guardian; and co-editor of the W.W. Norton landmark anthology Language for a New Century: Contemporary Poetry from the Middle East, Asia & Beyond, both Academy of American Poets bestsellers. She has worked on over twenty theatrical productions either as a playwright, director or producer. Author of eight plays, her most recent works have been produced at The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, the Bush Theatre and Westminster Abbey in London. Handal’s work has been translated into over 15 languages. She is a professor at New York University, and writes the literary travel column, The City and the Writer for Words without Borders.

Picture5Salma Khalil completed her Master of Science degree in cultural and social anthropology at the University of Amsterdam, and her career has been guided by her passion for knowledge production and sharing. She seeks to contribute to the production and sharing of knowledge on social equality and welfare, with a specific focus on knowledge gathered from the most impacted on the ground, as well as the use of knowledge in specific relation to policy, academic research, social and civil society work.

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